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The Shark Bite Show Episode 26: Kelly Fitzgerald Junco on Her Striving Through Injury

Nick 
Welcome to the Shark Bite show. We dive into the stories of our members, coaches, friends, and family. Shark Bite  Fitness and nutrition. All right, let’s go. Welcome to the Shark Bite show. I am here with Kelly Fitzgerald,d who I made sure I said that, right? You did. One of my long-term friends, a former staff member, now a new mom, and a member here at the Cape Coral location. We’re going to dive into a bunch of stuff because Kelly has a really interesting background and interesting viewpoint and a whole lot of stuff to say. Yes, all the way. Here. Yeah, Kelly. So thank you. Thank you for doing this.

Kelly 
Thanks for having me on. I’m happy to be here.

Nick 
Me too. I’m glad we got you on season two. So I’m going to let you talk. Where are you? What do you do for work? Stuff like that?

Kelly
Yes. So my name is Kelly. I am from the suburbs of Philadelphia. I was born in Florida on a plantation. But my parents moved up to New Jersey when I was young. And then we moved outside of Philly. So I say I’m from there. Because that’s where I grew up and spent most of my time and went to college. And for work, I do marketing for an organization called she recovers, which is recovery for women by women for women, and I do lots of marketing and social media a. And they also freelance, and I have a blog.

Nick 
Cool, a pretty famous blog. That’s excellent. I wasn’t asked to next run an incredibly popular blog called the silvers and ureter, right? Yes. Discuss what that is, its purpose, and how people can find it.

Kelly 
Yeah, it’s funny. I don’t know. I don’t consider myself famous. But thanks. So I started my blog when I got sober. So some background info. The reason it’s called sober senorita because I used to live in Mexico. I lived there for five years after college. And just for anybody who doesn’t know, the whole reason I went is that I went on spring break when I was in college, and I wanted to party after I graduated. And I was like, oh, what can I do? And I saw these people working during spring break when I was there. And they were like reps, selling trips and then picking up kids at the airport. I was like, I’m going to do that because I graduated in December. So it was like right before spring break season. So that helped me apply to all these companies. So one hired me, and they sent me to Cancun. I stayed for two spring break seasons and then moved there full time. And it was just as insane as everybody thinks it is. And I know a lot of people go there for vacation. So they know. But living there’s just like a whole other level. So yeah, that’s why I ended up getting sober there. And I had already been blogging for work. I was doing social media writing, blogging, doing travel writing, and my coworkers were like you should start a blog. You’re writing so well. Like you have an interesting story. And many people I know from there are ex-pats living in Cancun from Canada, Australia, and England, and some have blogs. So I was like, Okay, sweet. I’ll do it. My sister thought of the name sober. Senorita. So I got to credit her. Because I was like, Well, I’m like, I was eight months sober at the time. And I was like, What can I call this blog and want to incorporate my new sobriety? So she’s like, What about sober seniors? Yeah, like, that’s cute. So I did that. And like, at first, I wasn’t sure. I was going to write about my sobriety, but I wasn’t sure how to approach it because it was all new to me. And I didn’t know if I was continuing to be sober. But I ended up writing about some travel writing and things I would do around Cancun. And then, when I hit one year sober, I wrote my first blog about sobriety. And that went viral and picked up by the Huffington Post, which is why my blog became so popular quickly. And it was crazy. I remember I got an email from the Huffington Post on my Gmail account, like, hey, we want to republish your blog, and I was like, Is this spam? Yeah,

Nick 
I would believe that. Yeah,

Kelly 
I did. And I had my co-workers read it for me. I’m like, What do you guys think they’re like? Right-back, it looks legit. It’s like a real email. I’m like, okay, so I did, and they had me on HuffPost Live, and then, after going live on the Huffington Post, got shared a million times and all this stuff. And it’s been translated into five languages. It’s super crazy because the blog was about the things I learned during my first year sober, and I was kind of like, coming out as sober to everybody that didn’t know and sharing it on my social media. And I was like, Holy crap, people, I guess, want to hear about this. I mean, there weren’t many people at that time talking about being sober online. Now there is. So that’s completely different. But yeah, and I continue to write about my life. I just feel like I live less about sobriety now because I’ve been through so much other stuff in the last few years. So I get to talk about everything. So it’s really fun and rewarding for the people who follow my blog, my social media, and me. They’re always writing me messages like thank you so much for talking about this. This and whatever it is, I’m going through. And it’s a two-way street because I, like you know, have hard days, and I’m like, I’m just going to write how I feel. And then people make me feel better with their comments and stuff. So it works both ways.

Nick 
Yeah, it would have to evolve because of your life experiences. Right? Exactly. Yeah. This episode is brought to you by punch, gunk. Punch gunk is pain relief and anti-inflammatory rub. You put it on your muscles and joints; you’ll feel better using it. A couple of weeks ago, my back was killing me from a deadlift workout, and I couldn’t bend over without strong discomfort. One of the players convinced me to use them rather than on my back. Fifteen minutes later, I was doing muscle-ups and snatches with no pain. I absolutely could not believe it, but it’s true. They’re a supporter of the podcast now. If you want to try it out, go to punch gong.com and use code sharks 10. You’ll get a discount. This stuff is amazing. It’s all over my gym. Now the South Florida sharks in Florida use it. Big, big, big supporter of it now. Check it out at punch gong.com. Use code sharks 10 for a discount. All right, so what is your history in fitness and sports individually?

Kelly 
Yeah, so I’ve always been into fitness. I’ve been playing soccer since I was like four years old. So that’s like my thing. I’m a soccer player. And I remember when I was in third grade, I tried to quit because you’re going to laugh at this. I like being at a camp or something and running sprints, and like, you know, when your windpipe hurts, and your chest hurts from breathing hard. And you’re like sprinting, and it’s uncomfortable. It was like the first time I had ever felt like that. And I was like, What is this? Like, I hate this. It’s so uncomfortable. I’m quitting, and this is not fun. And like I told my mom, she’s like, well, I paid for your caps and will not quit. And I was like, oh, and she forced me to keep playing. And I was like, I always tell her I’m like, I’m so glad that you forced me to keep playing because obviously I love soccer, and I still play. But yeah, so for my entire life. I played soccer in high school and played in college. I play in women’s leagues now. So that was like my baseline fitness. I also liked the swim team, track, and field growing up. But then I got hurt in high school. So I like to quit everything except soccer. And then, after I got sober is how I found CrossFit. And I had some extra time on my hands. And I was like, I had heard about CrossFit. And it looked intimidating, which does for a lot of people. And I even was like; I’ve already had so many injuries. Is it for me? I don’t know. But it looked cool. So I wanted to try, and I talked to a few girls I played soccer with in college that did it. They were like, and you can do it. You can scale stuff. It’s fine. Like, they’ll work with you on your knees. And I was like, okay, so I tried it. And I did my first on-ramp in Mexico because I lived there then. So I started there and then continued when we moved here to Cape Coral.

Nick 
Cool. Yeah, because you told me you did your first onramp in Spanish, right? Yes. Yeah. And I speak Spanish.

Kelly 
Yeah, I spoke a little bit but not in anything like Olympic lifting or anything like that. I had no clue what was going on. Like it was my friends and me because my best friend, one of my best friends from Cancun, she’s from Scotland. So she and I were doing this together. And she didn’t speak Spanish, even less than me. And we were just like after we went into the real class, we were just watching what everybody else was doing, like copying them. And I have a picture of myself with like the PVC pipe trying to do like I don’t even know a clean I think it’s so funny when I think back to

Nick 
it that we’ve had that here, you know, but like the opposite, right? Because we only have one Spanish-speaking coach on the staff right now. And we’ve had people join the gym who don’t speak English. And it’s always exactly what you’re saying. It’s like doing our best to communicate, they’re doing their best to understand, and there’s lots of looking around and being like, do what that guy does. So yeah, exactly. Yeah. Well, so what year was that? I do remember?

Kelly 
When I started CrossFit. That was 2014, 2014. Okay,

Nick 
and then remember the year you started playing soccer?

Kelly 
Originally, or, I mean, I started playing soccer when I was like four years old. Okay. So long. Yeah, probably like 30 years ago or so.

Nick 
So, why has staying fit been so important? You for that long? And how has it changed over the years?

Kelly 
Yeah. So when I think back to how I was a kid, staying fit was fun. I made a lot of friends. And it helped me grow up, like, helped me learn how to be a part of a team and find friends like all of my best friends from high school played soccer like the weird one. We’re still friends, and we’ve gone to each other’s weddings. And it was always fun and like I love the competitiveness and like I just love like in terms of soccer Like, I played defense, so racing someone down the field and trying to get the ball from was so exciting. So that’s rewarding. And I think then at like high school college kind of when I started drinking and using drugs; it became like an outlet for me when I was like, just, you know, doing crazy things and like, not even knowing what I was doing just feeling lost. Even while drinking and using drugs, I always had sports to ground me and bring me back to the middle. And then after I got sober, the same thing and in a bigger way, it kind of kept me sober in a way and helped me with my emotional outlet, and it’s the only way I can like not to numb myself without using drugs and alcohol. Like, you know, you get in that headspace where you can’t; you don’t know what’s happening around you. And you’re going as hard as you can and Awad, and you don’t have to worry about anything else. Your phone’s not ringing; you’re not thinking about what you must do. You’re not thinking about not drinking or whatever it may be. So it’s been really important to me that way too. And, again, it’s still a way that I make all my friends.

Nick 
That part’s really important. Mental health the benefit to mental health. This is war and making friends with people you want to be friends with. Because when you get your 30s, How do you find that?

Kelly 
yeah, so hard. And even before I joined CrossFit, when we moved to Florida, I had soccer friends because that was the first thing I did. And I’m still friends with all of them. But yeah, in terms of mental health, it’s like any day I’m having a bad day. I was like; I have to get to the gym, I have to do something, I have to get out of the house. I have to get out of my head. And the only way is to do that. It’s like working out.

Nick 
So you have hinted at a little bit of a wild injury history. Yeah, you have more leg injuries than any person I think I’ve ever met.

Kelly 
What about Joe Carrey?

Nick 
He’s got 50 years on you. So he’s allowed to. By the way, he’s coming on the show. Spoiler alert, it’s going to be so much fun. So tell me about your copious amounts of lower-body injuries, right?

Kelly 
Yes. So I’ve had six knee surgeries, three on each side. But it wasn’t always even until my last one. But yeah, it started when I was 16 years old. So it’s hard to remember when I didn’t have an injury or wasn’t coming back from an injury or playing with a knee brace. It’s tough. It’s, I remember, I’ll never like to picture in my mind every single time it happened. Those knee injuries were torn ACLs. For everybody listening, I’m sure you’ve heard of that. It’s pretty much like having your knee blown out. And with that, we’re like meniscus tears and everything else that comes with it. Normally, you don’t tear an ACL just by itself. And like when I was 16, I didn’t realize how significant the injury was. I was like, oh, there’s like this injury and get better and bounce back pretty quickly. Right. And unfortunately, we didn’t know enough about the injury, I think, and how to fix it. And there are decisions about how you can fix it, which means like cadaver graft and all that stuff.,d, so my parents chose a patellar tendon graft. And it was rehabbed for eight months. I waited; I didn’t play soccer. I didn’t do any things like running in a straight line. And then I finally liked playing, and the very first time I played again, tour, oh my gosh, and that happened to me twice. So when that was my right leg, which happened in high school and then I went to, I got better. I went off to college. I joined the soccer team in college, and then my sophomore year, I tore my left knee, and it was the off-season. It was an indoor, both of my Yep, all three for three out of four times that I tore them were in indoor settings. And then those other surgeries were just like ones where they went in and modified some things. So not ACL reconstruction, just for ACL reconstructions into, you know, other surgeries and for anyone

Nick 
who doesn’t know indoor soccer is way more physical than national soccer? Yeah, it’s like hockey, but I’m fake grass with walls.

Kelly 
Yeah, I think it has to do with the surface, like the gym floor. I think basketball players tear their ACL and stuff to the pivoting and everything for me, and then I think grass just has some more give. So you have a little bit more cushioning, or at least in my case,

Nick 
but yeah, so when you were playing, you played on the basketball floor? Yeah. So high school was

Kelly 
on basketball flooring. And then in college, when I did, it was like, like cheap looking astroturf. Yeah, that’s an endorsed Yes. So different ones but same. So yes. Yeah, I think these injuries affected my mental health, and In a way, it was probably why I drank and used drugs for a while, just one of the many reasons, including genetics and other things. But because I was so devastated, like every time it happened the first time, I didn’t understand what was happening. I was like, Oh, I’ll be fine. Like, I’ll get back to playing. And I did like it, and I have to give myself credit. Like, I went back and like my senior year of high school, and then my senior year of college, I went back out and played just as good as I did before the injury. So I feel grateful because I know many people get these injuries and can’t play at the same level or don’t want to or don’t want to do the work. But yeah, it’s been emotionally devastating, like spiritually devastating. It’s really hard. But it’s also like, I don’t know another way because this has been my life from the get-go. So with CrossFit, I think I’ve only seen positive things from CrossFit because all of my injuries have been in soccer. Yeah.

Nick
So I want to make sure I say that that gets ACL tears.

Kelly 
And I want to make sure everybody knows that CrossFit has helped me get in better shape and help the muscles around my knees and my ligaments do better and are more fit for when I do because I still play now. Even though I probably shouldn’t. But, um, but yeah, it’s like, I feel like if it was some other type of gym routine, I might not be able to do it. But with CrossFit, there are ways to modify how the workouts are set up; it helps my knees get stronger instead of tearing them down. So that’s why I love it.

Nick 
Yeah. I feel like I yell at you every time I hear you play soccer. But yes, I agree, you know, strengthening your leg muscles, strengthening the rest of your body, getting your core better, and your balance better. Those are the kinds of things that stop those injuries from happening. And that’s what we do here.

Kelly 
So right, exactly.

Nick 
How did you find us back when we were CrossFit Cape Coral, right when you first started here? Yeah, so

Kelly 
My history with CrossFit here in Florida. It is interesting, because we did it in Mexico and Cancun, and then we decided to move here. And the reason we moved here is that my parents had a snowbird house here. They were going back and forth between Philly and here. And they were like, you can just stay at our house. And then you figure out where you want to live. We had never been to Cape Coral. We’re like, okay, like we didn’t know, we were like Florida. And so the first thing I did was Google a gym when I got here, and we went to a different gym and the cape. And it was good. But it felt very intimidating. Like I said before, I was still in the phase where I didn’t know what was happening. I didn’t know how to do all the lifts yet, and everybody was very competitive. And I just felt like I couldn’t keep up. And it was really like getting me down. And I was like, I can’t do this. I don’t like CrossFit like, so I ended up quitting. And I thought I was done with CrossFit. I was like, Oh, this is not for me. And so I quit. And then I was just playing soccer. And then I think it was the summer of 2015. I had a soccer teammate, who was part owner of CrossFit, and she was like, you know, crud, and trying to recruit us girls to enter her gym. And I was like, oh, no, like I did CrossFit. It’s not for me; I don’t like it. It’s just too much. It’s too competitive. I couldn’t keep up and was just getting frustrated with myself. And she was like, No, my gyms don’t like that. Like you should try it. And like I didn’t understand at that point that CrossFit gyms have different environments and cultures and that they could be so different. I was just thinking, this is the sport, and it’s not for me. So I was like, Oh, fine. And at that point, I felt heavier than normal because I was like. And I was like, Yeah, I need something else besides soccer because this is not enough. So I went in with her and did a workout, which was CrossFit with her at the time, and it was fun, and it was smaller, with not a lot of people. But all fitness levels, not like all of these six-packs and like really fit like 20-year-olds like lifting heavy weights and doing crazy things which I had seen it the other gym, this was like moms and older people and like people from all levels of fitness, and I was like, Oh, I fit in better here like this is nice. And I liked it. So I kept going, and I kept going. So I ended up joining, and then CrossFit hurt. Got bought out by CrossFit que por el sol. I didn’t know much about CrossFit Cape Coral then, and I was sad because I had this little group that I liked at CrossFit. And we were going to go through this big change where CrossFit Cape Coral took over, and I was like, I don’t know what’s going to be like there’s going to be new people and new coaches like what’s going to happen, but it ended up being awesome. So I’m glad it happened.

Nick 
Yeah, it was. That was a fun transition when we kind of because it was different. We didn’t just take over the gym; we moved into the gym. Yes, we left our old location, which was not as nice as this one and not as big as the one we’re in now. Summer has been a pretty strange feeling. We were like moving in and changing things to the place that felt like your guy’s house, right?

Kelly 
Yes. Yeah. And it was in this building. I’ve been in this building since 2015.

Nick 
Yeah, that man, I haven’t thought about that. Because for us, it’s 15. Yeah, for us. It’s only been a couple of years, but Right. Well, so I remember we were being very specific. We were having staff meetings, like we have to be as inclusive as possible of these people, because they’re going to feel like we’re coming in and stepping on their stuff, you know? Yeah. I think we did our best. I don’t know if we did a perfect job. But we do our best to do that. Because we kept quite a few CrossFit members for a very long time. So most of them do terrible.

Kelly 
job. No, it was good. Again, it was a different environment and culture than the other places I had been. And I had been to several places at this point, the one in Mexico, the first one we went here in Cape, CrossFit hurt. And now this new one, and I’m like, okay, it was more people, just more coaches that were more knowledgeable. You guys, I felt like I had plans for everything. And like, we’re structured even from the beginning. I know; you’re even more structured now. But, I thought, Okay, I think this will be good. So it ended up being good.

Nick 
Oh, cool. I’m glad to hear that. Yeah. So you were also a staff member here for many years—sometime after that. I can’t remember what it was really at this point. But remember, I took over fully, and we had this plan to restructure the gym, take us down a new path, you know. And you at the time, Shannon, Jim Brad, right. Like, You guys helped me clarify the vision of what eventually SharkBite was going to be. I mean, it was just the framework back then, but yeah. And it was not very organized. Lots of learning curves. What’s it been like being along the ride for so many changes, right? So like, you were, you were across with her, and then we took over, and I changed a lot of stuff shortly after that. And then we changed our name, did an entire rebrand, and opened up two more locations. That’s for a while, and then we became an online gym. Like, what’s it been like being through all those? Those transitions?

Kelly 
It’s been interesting. No, I, you know, I think, I think for myself, I’ve learned so much, because a lot of us that started CrossFit way back, like, think about CrossFit, as was one thing like, that is like this thing of working out hard. And you have a mindset that you think about what CrossFit is. You work out hard, get PRs, and do this. And so basically, when you took over like, and you were going down the new path, with CrossFit, Cape Coral, and then SharkBite, you taught me that that’s not what CrossFit is. And like, I learned about, like, what’s really happening with gyms and what path everyone’s going down in terms of like, kind of breaking away from CrossFit and doing their own thing, but still keeping the same pillars of functional fitness and, and what you need to run a successful gym and stay close to your core values. And I had never, like, thought of that.
I’m like, Oh, you just you know, you join CrossFit, you pay a fee like, and then members that are good across it become coaches, like what you learn, right? Right. So I think, like many things, it took me a little while to get on board because I’m like, Oh, this is not what I learned or knew before. But then I learned it. I’m like, okay, like; this makes sense to me. And honestly, it’s what I wanted in the beginning, like, why I quit in the first place was exactly what you tried to prevent. No,w by doing no sweat intros, being welcoming to everyone, and creating an environment in a culture where this fitness thing is for everybody. And it’s not even considered just CrossFit. And that’s like what I needed back then. But I just didn’t like to understand or know, and I didn’t have the words for that. So it’s been interesting, and when you changed the name to sharp, I again fought you on that. I was like, why is it bad? But you know, it’s just hard for me to like, you know, change is hard, and it takes me a little bit to get on board than I get on board, and I have to say one thing: that I trust you. I know you know this facility, the culture, and fitness in general. So I believe you when you say things, even the crazy first, and sometimes I’m like, what are you telling? We’re not doing it, and then you’re already doing it. That’s normally what happens. But yeah, it takes me a little bit, but normally I come on board, and I’m like, Okay, this, this makes sense. And then it always works out. It always is like a better; we’re going to be better for it. We’re a better facility and group. So yeah, I fought you on the name thing because I just love the name CrossFit Cape Coral. But you know, we have had that in the past. It’s part of our history. So I don’t have to let go of it.

Nick 
altogether. Yeah, you just gave everybody an insight into our initial staff meetings. As we put those together. Like you, Jim and Shannon, tell me, ” Hold on. Let’s slow down and meet like it’s too late. We’ve already started.

Kelly 
I’m like, Wait, this is a very big decision. Did you think about this, and you’re like, I’ve been thinking about it for three years.

Nick 
That’s how it’d be; alright, guys, I want to move the toilet. And you guys be like, hold on. We need to think about this for a long time. I’d be like, Look; I already took one of the toilets off. It’s too late. Yeah,

Kelly 
That’s exactly it.

Nick 
We’re down the path.

Kelly 
You’re explaining exactly what it’s like to work for you.

Nick 
Yeah, I’ve made a decision, and it makes it so that you can’t say no to this at this point.

Kelly 
I used to get annoyed because I’d be like, Why? Like, but I knew by the time you told us you had already done it or already been half done doing whatever the thing is that you were bringing up to us. And then I would get so mad because I’m like, Why can’t you tell me when it’s like in the idea stage. So I can prepare myself and like we can all prepare? Okay, this is coming, and it’s going to scare me. You’re happening soon. No, it just felt like dropping a bomb on us.

Nick 
Because I knew a lot of times, you guys would try to talk me out of it.

Kelly 
Yeah, the best still did and never worked. The best way to

Nick 
ensure you can’t talk me out of it to be a 40% donor. Yeah, time and money and resources are invested in it.

Kelly 
Again, that’s something I tried to fight you on forever. But now I’m to the point where I’m like, I’m not even surprised because it’s just how he is.

Nick 
Now, Katie, Sue, and Val have to deal with that. Right? Exactly. Okay, so I know two things important to you in a gym. And they’re important to me also, are feeling comfortable and safe, kind of like that feeling of like, inclusivity. Right, and then giving back to the community. Right? What are those matters to you? How have we done that? Because you were part of a bunch of initiatives we did here for those things. Right. Like, talk to me about that?

Kelly 
Yeah, yeah, I think those things are important to me, in general, like in life, and in my life, like with sobriety, and, you know, writing and just like what I want to do with my life, like trying to make a difference giving back to the community and like making people feel safe. It’s like a general sense of what I want to do with my life. So, of course, it would also be important for me, like in a gym setting, and I feel like some people are like, why would you even need that in a gym setting. But I think about that, like, everywhere I go, everything, from what business I’m buying to whatever, and gyms, you pay for membership. So it’s important, like what you’re spending your money on, like what you’re contributing to. So the values of an organization are important to me, and I knew from the get-go that your values aligned with mine by how I helped you, like writing them in the beginning. And also, I feel like, with Jim’s, it can be a vulnerable space, especially for women just, you know, not like the Globo gym, because the Globo gym, you know, guys come up to you and like, say things are trying to like to correct your form that doesn’t happen here.
In CrossFit, really in general, I would say, but who knows, every gym is different. So that’s good. But just like, you know, shutting down if people gossip or talk about anything that makes you uncomfortable. And then that has happened in the past. And it’s been shut down very quickly and taken care of. And I appreciate that. And I, I wish that for everyone, not just me, I want everyone to feel safe and comfortable. And like we all come here with different ideas, beliefs, and values. And like the people who didn’t have the same values as us as an organization, you maybe went and found a different gym, and that’s fine. And I think that’s good. And I think I always encourage everybody, but I have encouraged you to, like, just stick to what you believe. And some people won’t like that. Some people will leave, and that’s okay. What was the other part of that question?

Nick 
Well, so on what you just said, I think that like, you know, it’s a super turbulent time in the world right now. You know, our mission is to improve the lives of our members through fitness, nutrition, community, and camaraderie. Right. And to do that, you have to feel okay and happy going into a place, you know, you can’t walk into that place and be like, Man, I wonder if someone’s going to be addicted to me today. We just can’t have it because you can’t achieve that mission with that; I think what you said is a really good point. Some people don’t, and that’s not important to them. And that’s okay. Right?

Kelly 
Yeah. And it’s hard to live your values daily and through your organization. And also to find organizations that align with your values. It’s really hard. Yeah, it is. So I want to acknowledge that and like, understand that, you know. It’s not 100% every day or like, some days are harder than others, or your, you know, these values are in motion and will be edited when they need to be, and you know, every day is different, but you try hard to stick to them and make changes as you progress. So I admire that.

Nick 
Cool, thank you. So the next part was giving back to the community. Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah.

Kelly 
Again, important to me. And just in life in general, I feel like, what’s the point of us being here, we’re not going to like help. Yeah. So, you know, our competitions here with reindeer games give back the Toys for Tots. And we’ve selected other charities in the past to give back to, um, I can’t think of the exact ones at this moment. But, that’s always been a goal of this organization, and again, written into the values and like the blood drives you’re doing right now. And those kinds of things are important to me. Because, again, like, why are we here?
Why are we doing this if we’re not like giving back and helping people? And I’ve even talked to you about doing sobriety-type things here at the gym, and you have always been responsive about offering this facility to me for those things? And I appreciate that. And I hope we can do more of that in the future. And it just means that your heart is in the right place and you’re willing to help people. And oh, and also, this facility is in a community, right? Because we need to give back to the people that are part of this community and like to live and work here. And some people have certain jobs, like firefighters and police officers, and we do things for them. And we run their five K’s, and you know, we stick by them and know they’re supported. And, you know, we are an organization in a community. So we want to give back to the community that we’re in because that’s the whole point of having a business here, right? Really

Nick 
That’s a small business; that’s a business, right? If we don’t expect Amazon to do that because Amazon doesn’t have a place they call home, right? Right. Zamani. I love Cape Coral. I’m not from here, but I love this place. And I’m growing to love the rest of Southwest Florida now. And so we try to do something at least quarterly, right per gem, like Katie Miller, who’s on the bug and is in charge of all of our community outreach stuff right now. So the one you sent me to her, she’s vetting it and finding out how we can work with it. Awesome. Yeah. Because you know, we’ve talked about this in the past like I’m, as a military member, very specific about which military charities we’ll work with.

Kelly 
know, as you should be, yeah. Everybody should be when they get the charities that they give to.

Nick 
But by agreement, like, what, why are we a local business? Why are we community businesses if we’re not going to give back to the community? Right,

Kelly 
right. It’s just it’s not about just collecting people’s money and giving them a workout. Do you know what I mean? Yeah, it’s something bigger. So

Nick 
When I mean anybody who hears this, right, like any of our members, it’s pretty easy to convince me to work with one of our champions, right? That’s just got to be something one of our people cares about. Get it to me. And if it’s something we can realistically do, we just do it. You know, right. Remember you and me dropping off the food for Thanksgiving? Yeah, because we were the other one, I think it was trying to pick up. We didn’t plan out where to drop it off well enough. Yeah. Like driving around downtown Fort Myers giving food away.

Kelly
Okay, well, we finally picked one. But yeah, you have to like to play on the drop-off. But yeah, we’re learning what other charities need stuff. Oh, I think Ryan Peterson and Katie organized one for x. Yeah, that was awesome. Yeah, we dropped off supplies that they needed at that facility. So that was another good one.

Nick 
So you have now been working out a very, very long time as we’ve established right too long. You said at the beginning, right. This can be intimidating. Yeah. And even our place can be intimidating, like starting a fitness or health routine can be extremely intimidating. Right? What would you say to somebody who was thinking about starting but was, you know, afraid? Intimidated, nervous, anxious, what would you say to him?

Kelly 
Yeah, I would say I feel your pain. And like, It’s not weird that you feel that way, and that’s normal. And also that you must find a place where you feel safe and comfortable. And you’re part of a community, and your community does things like evac, all of those things, I think to make you feel more comfortable starting something new or being with new people. I love CrossFit and like SharkBite because you get to be in a class where the coach explains everything to you, and you’re in a group doing things together. Although you offer personal training, you’re not like yourself, which is awesome.
I’m just saying I like the group setting because you have people like talking to you and cheering you on, and you’re not alone; you’re not trying to learn this thing yourself. Have a coach, high-level coaching that explains exactly what you’re supposed to be done safely. So basically, all you have to do is show up. And that’s a little bit less intimidating, I would say, when you know that all you have to do is show up, walk through the door, and someone’s going to explain to you exactly what you need to do, and you’re going to get a good workout, and everything will be great. I also would say it gets easier as the years continue to show up. Even though I’ve been through a lot of crap, like injuries, I just had a baby. And it’s been mentally tough for me because I felt like I was very fit before and in a good place with what I was achieving here, like my PRs and my gymnastics. And so, you know, it’s kind of not starting over, I would say because I worked out during my pregnancy, but you know, just not being able to do some of the same things. So I feel those frustrations. But, just like life, the up and down and up and down, you just have to keep showing up, keep showing up. And remember, like, why you’re doing the thing. So like, two years ago, I was doing the thing because I wanted to get a high clean PR and a muscle-up. I’m doing this because I want my mental health to be stable so I can take care of my baby. And I want to get out of my house and out of my head for the day. And I just want to show up and complete the workout. And that looks a little bit different. So our goals change.

Nick 
Or that was going to be my next question. But you got through it. So yeah, awesome. Is there a thing I was going to talk about?

Kelly 
I don’t think so. Oh, I think I didn’t say where people can find me.

Nick 
I was going to ask that next. Yeah. So yeah, as I said, Kelly runs a sober center and reads a blog. So, where would they find you on the internet? Where would they find you on social media?

Kelly 
Yes. sobersenorita.com. And on Instagram, thesobersenorita.

Nick 
Awesome. Well, those will be in the show notes. So they’ll be easy to click on if you guys want to do that. Kelly, thank you. Thank you for all the work you did when you were a staff member. Yeah. Thanks for being a good friend. Thanks for doing the podcast.

Kelly 
Yeah, I appreciate it. I’m glad to be here.

Nick 
Awesome. All right. Thanks for hanging out with us today on the Shark Bite show. If you’d like to get a hold of us, you find us on Facebook or Instagram at Shark Bite fitness Nutrition or on our website at SharkBiteFitness.com. If you’d like to learn more about our guests, their information will be in the show notes. Suppose you’d like to talk to us about getting more fit. Schedule a free no-sweat intro at one of our Cape Coral, Fort Myers, or Naples, Florida locations.

Check Kelly on these social links:
FB: The Sober Señorita
IG: @thesobersenorita
website: www.sobersenorita.com

Be sure to check out this episode of the #TheSharkBiteShow. 
 
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